What Makes a Good Children's Book and Writer?

I finished reading one of my favorite books, James and the Giant Peach, by Roald Dahl. I’d read the book for the first time when I was eight or nine. Reading it to the kid’s too.

Dahl known for such classics as Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Matilda, and BFG. He is a fantastic storyteller and deserves kudos for his canon of work. The books hold up even if he uses a plethora of exclamation points!!!

I found this quote from an interview where he explains what makes for a good children’s writer/book:

What makes a good children’s writer? The writer must have a genuine and powerful wish not only to entertain children, but to teach them the habit of reading…[He or she] must be a jokey sort of fellow…[and] must like simple tricks and jokes and riddles and other childish things. He must be unconventional and inventive. He must have a really first-class plot. He must know what enthralls children and what bores them. They love being spooked. They love ghosts. They love the finding of treasure. The love chocolates and toys and money. They love magic. They love being made to giggle. They love seeing the villain meet a grisly death. They love a hero and they love the hero to be a winner. But they hate descriptive passages and flowery prose. They hate long descriptions of any sort. Many of them are sensitive to good writing and can spot a clumsy sentence. They like stories that contain a threat. “D’you know what I feel like?” said the big crocodile to the smaller one. “I feel like having a nice plump juicy child for my lunch.” They love that sort of thing. What else do they love? New inventions. Unorthodox methods. Eccentricity. Secret information. The list is long. But above all, when you write a story for them, bear in mind that they do not possess the same power of concentration as an adult, and they become very easily bored or diverted. Your story, therefore, must tantalize and titillate them on every page and all the time that you are writing you must be saying to yourself, “Is this too slow? Is it too dull? Will they stop reading?” To those questions, you must answer yes more often than you answer no. [If not] you must cross it out and start again. -“The Writer” Magazine in October, 1975: “A Note on Writing Books for Children”.